Stomach Ulcer Medication Side Effects

When a person is diagnosed with a stomach ulcer, doctors will often prescribe a combination of medications to help eliminate the cause of the ulcer (H pylori) and reduce the amount of acid that comes into contact with the exposed area, which can reduce stomach ulcer symptoms.

Two different antibiotics may be used to kill off the H pylori bacteria. A proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) and an H2 blocker are also commonly prescribed during treatment to assist with reducing stomach acids. Each of these medications carries certain side effects. While many side effects are mild or not harmful over time, they can seem significant to individuals.

Severe side effects are the leading cause of failed stomach ulcer treatments. Stomach ulcer medication side effects can be intolerable and a new medication must be implemented before continuing treatment. This can be a big challenge for some patients because there isn’t always another medication that will work for the patient because of allergies or other health conditions.

Some of the most severe side effects of stomach ulcer medications include hallucinations, peeling and blistering skin, convulsions, and blindness. These are considered extreme side effects and are comparable to “severe allergic reactions” for most physicians and require the person to be taken off of the medication that causes the side effects. Severe allergic reactions include hives, rashes, swelling of the face, neck or tongue, severe vomiting, and respiratory symptoms.

While most severe side-effects are rare, there are a number of common side effects that simply interrupt life for many people. Constant nausea, dizziness, headaches, coordination problems, and pain can be medication side effects that are debilitating for some.

Below we have listed some of the major reactions that can cause a patient to cease treatment for stomach ulcers due to medication side effects. These are not complete lists of side effect and each medication carriers a long list of possible reactions.


Side Effects of Antibiotics Used to Treat Stomach Ulcers

There are four antibiotic drugs that are most often employed when treating stomach ulcers. These are Metronidazole, Tetracycline, Clarithromycin and Amoxicillin.

Metronidazole side effects include severe allergic reactions, decreased coordination, numbness, tingling, seizures, severe diarrhea, severe or persistent dizziness or headache, speech problems, stomach pain or cramps, and vision loss.

Tetracycline side effects include severe allergic reactions, black hairy tongue, blurred vision, diarrhea, difficulty swallowing, headache, inflammation or redness of tongue, joint pain, sensitivity to sunlight, stomach pain, and swelling and itching of the rectum.

Calrithromycin side effects include severe allergic reactions, confusion, depression, dizziness, mood changes, fast or irregular heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of taste or sense of smell, muscle weakness, nightmares, seizures, severe diarrhea, severe stomach pain, jaundice, severe or persistent nausea, loss of appetite, tremors, and trouble sleeping.

Amoxicillin side effects include severe allergic reactions, confusion, red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin, seizures, severe diarrhea, stomach pain, unusual bruising or bleeding, and jaundice.


Side Effects of H2 Blockers Used to Treat Stomach Ulcers

There are four H2 blockers that are most commonly prescribed to treat stomach ulcers. These are Famotidine, Cimetidine, Ranitidine, and Nizatidine.

Famotidine side effects include severe allergic reactions (difficulty breathing, tightness in the chest, swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue), seizures), and irregular heartbeat.

Cimetidine side effects include severe allergic reaction, agitation, anxiety, breast lumps, confusion, depression, disorientation, hallucinations, hair loss, joint and muscle pain, sexual difficulties, and slow or fast heartbeat.

Ranitidine side effects include severe allergic reactions, confusion, red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin, seizures, severe stomach pain, unusual bruising or bleeding, and jaundice.

Nizatidine side effects include severe allergic reactions, abdominal pain, jaundice, headache, insomnia, and dizziness.

Side Effects of Proton-Pump Inhibitors Used to Treat Stomach Ulcers

There are three proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) that are usually prescribed to treat stomach ulcers. These are Omeprazole, Lansoprazole, and Pantoprazole.

Omeprazole side effects include severe allergic reactions, bone pain, chest pain, irregular heartbeat, red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin, seizures, severe diarrhea, severe stomach , unusual bruising or bleeding, vision changes, and jaundice.

Lansoprazole side effects include severe allergic reactions, chest pain, confusion, depression, fainting, fast or irregular heartbeat, mood changes, numbness of an arm or leg, red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin, ringing in the ears, seizures, severe headache, dizziness,; severe stomach pain, severe nausea, severe vomiting, shortness of breath, unusual bruising or bleeding, joint pain, muscle pain, vision, hearing, or speech changes, vomit that looks like coffee grounds, and jaundice.

Pantoprazole side effects includes severe allergic reactions, bone pain, chest pain, fast or irregular heartbeat, red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin, unusual bruising or bleeding, unusual tiredness, vision changes, and jaundice.

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